Book of Titus


Titus could have been the stimulus for that engaging series of commercials promoting MasterCard where you have a series of items/events priced out followed by one super significant item/event that is labelled simply “Priceless.” So it is with Sound Doctrine for the Apostle Paul as he gives leadership instructions to his son in the faith Titus. There is no disconnect between faith and good works for Paul.

for the faith of those chosen of God and the knowledge of the truth which is according to godliness” – Titus 1:1

so that those who have believed God may be careful to engage in good deeds.” – Titus 3:8

 

Big Idea:

Qualified Leaders Promote Sound Doctrine Which Builds Genuine Faith Which Issues in Good Works of Service to Others

 

Basic Outline:

I. (1:5-9) APPOINT QUALIFIED ELDERS WHO CAN TEACH AND DEFEND SOUND DOCTRINE

A. (:5) THE NEED FOR ELDERS
B. (:6-9A) THE QUALIFICATIONS FOR ELDERS
C. (:9B) THE FUNCTION OF ELDERS (WITH RESPECT TO SOUND DOCTRINE)

II. (1:10-16) REPROVE REBELLIOUS TROUBLEMAKERS WHO SUBVERT SOUND DOCTRINE AND DENY GOD BY THEIR DEEDS

A. (:10-11) SILENCE THE FALSE TEACHERS
B. (:12-14) RESCUE THE GULLIBLE
C. (:15-16) DISCERN THE FALSE FROM THE TRUE — LOOK AT THEIR DEEDS

III. (2:1-3:11) PROCLAIM THE NECESSITY OF GOOD WORKS TO ADORN SOUND DOCTRINE

A. (:2:1-10) WHAT DOES SOUND DOCTRINE LOOK LIKE WHEN IT IS ALL DRESSED UP AND ON DISPLAY?
B. (2:11-15) THERE IS NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT FOR GOOD DEEDS
C. (3:1-7) WHAT’S THE CONNECTION BETWEEN GOOD WORKS AND SALVATION?
D. (3:8-11) SOUND DOCTRINE IS PROFITABLE BECAUSE IT ALWAYS LINKS GENUINE FAITH TO GOOD DEEDS

 

Why Study This Book?

  • To learn the qualifications for God ordained leaders in the local assembly
  • To grasp the essential connection between sound doctrine and good works
  • To gain the fortitude to strongly reprove false teachers who profess to know God but are exposed by their deeds
  • To understand the distinctive role of gender/age specific groups in the church
  • To live with the sense of hope and expectation that the grace of God is intended to nurture
  • To learn to engage in good deeds to meet the pressing needs of others

 

Notable Quotes:

David Malick: Paul writes Titus as his representative in Crete to aid the churches in a prophylactic way against Jewish false teachers by appointing those in leadership who are able to manage God’s household well and stand against the false teachers, and by exhorting all believers to excel in good works so that they might reach those outside of the church with the gospel.

Daniel Wallace: Since Titus’ church on Crete was newly planted, the main concern of Paul was that the believers begin living an exemplary Christian life, so as to be an example of the grace of God to their pagan neighbors. The essence of Titus can be summed up thus in the twofold theme of (1) doing good works especially (2) for the sake of outsiders.

Hampton Keathley III: The apostle Paul consistently shows us how good works or the conduct of the Christian is vitally connected with the person and work of Christ, past, present, and future. Even in this very short, concise epistle both the deity (2:13) and redemptive work of the Savior (2:12) are vital elements and stand to the theme of good works like root to fruit. Christ is first personified as the grace of God that brings salvation, but whose very appearing instructs us to a life of godliness (vs. 11). Then, He is emphatically described as “our great God and Savior, Christ Jesus, who gave Himself for us to redeem us from every lawless deed, and to purify for Himself a people for His own possession, zealous for good deeds” (2:13-14).

Wil Pounds: In this letter of Paul to Titus he describes the “healthy” church as follows: An orderly church-has competent leadership and committed followers (1:5-16). A sound church -is solid in the truth of the Scriptures (2:1-15). A practicing church-their life-style is characterized by good deeds (3:1-11).

Ray Stedman: Now the basic need of these people was to have “sound doctrine,” a phrase that occurs several times throughout the letter. Paul knew that to change society, people must be told the truth — this is the problem with men and women everywhere. This is why they walk in darkness and act like animals, tearing one another apart and hating one another — because they do not understand themselves or the world. So you have to begin by teaching them truth.

Along with that is another very basic need — the matter of “good deeds.” That phrase appears five times; chapter one closes with that idea, “unfit for any good deed,” {Tit 1:16b RSV} Then in chapter two, “Show yourself in all respects a model of good deeds, and in your teaching show integrity, gravity, and sound speech,” {Tit 2:7-8a RSV}. And chapter two also closes with that idea, “to purify for himself a people of his own who are zealous for good deeds,” {Tit 2:14b RSV}. In chapter three it says, “be careful to apply themselves to good deeds,” {Tit 3:8b RSV}, and once again, “let our people learn to apply themselves to good deeds,” {Tit 3:14a RSV}.

Isn’t this what the church is looking for, what the world is looking for? Sound doctrine — good, solid teaching, straight from the shoulder revelations of truth — and good deeds to back them up and prove the reality of the teaching.

Joe Kolkebeck: “Authority & Accountability or Anarchy & Disorder”
1. Protection of Doctrine

Set Things in Order – Chap 1 (1:5)

2. Practice of Doctrine

Conduct of Groups – Chap 2 (2:2-6,9)
Conduct in General – Chap 3 (3:1)

 

References: